Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Dr James Hansen: “We Have a Global Emergency”

 Violence And Bad Behaviour Increases

Increasing temperature seems to have a significant effect on interpersonal violence and human conflict, as indicated by a body of empirical evidence in a rapidly expanding area of scientific study. In an assembly of 60 quantitative studies    covering all major world regions, it is found that interpersonal violence increases by 4% and intergroup conflict by 14% for each standard deviation increase of temperature.  Such findings do not constitute natural laws, but they provide a useful empirical estimate of impacts of temperature change.

Earth Institute, Columbia University


Regional Climate Change and National Responsibilities

Fig. 2

The tropics and the Middle East in summer are in danger of becoming uninhabitable by the end of the century if emissions continue, because wet bulb temperature could approach the level at which the human body is unable to cool itself under even well-ventilated conditions, and temperatures are approaching the limit of human tolerance and agriculture is an outdoor activity. A shift of over 2C in the mean, the highest in the world.

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 Dr James  Hansen

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WikiLeaks: US, Saudis Planned to Topple Syria's Assad in 2012
Saudi Arabia, the US, France, and Britain were involved in a secret deal to overthrow Assad, from more than 60,000 classified Saudi diplomatic cables 


Syria War Was Planned In Advance, 
Because Syria is Anti-Israel, Says Ex-French Foreign Minister Dumas



Because Syria would not allow an oil pipeline through his country




In Praise of Impractical Movements

Bernie Sanders's insurgent presidential campaign has opened up a debate about how social change happens in our society. It is seldom as incremental as many suggest. Every once in a while, the great moments of equalizing reform -- securing labor rights, expanding the vote, creating a social safety net -- have been directly related to surges of widespread defiance.



Climate Variations Analyzed 5 Million Years Back in Time

UNIVERSITY OF COPENHAGEN - NIELS BOHR INSTITUTE
When we talk about climate change today, we have to look at what the climate was previously like in order to recognise the natural variations and to be able to distinguish them from the human-induced changes. Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute have analysed the natural climate variations over the last 12,000 years, during which we have had a warm interglacial period and they have looked back 5 million years to see the major features of the Earth's climate. The research shows that not only is the weather chaotic, but the Earth's climate is chaotic and can be difficult to predict. The results are published in the scientific journal, Nature Communications.
The Earth's climate system is characterised by complex interactions between the atmosphere, oceans, ice sheets, landmasses and the biosphere (parts of the world with plant and animal life). Astronomical factors also play a role in relation to the great changes like the shift between ice ages, which typically lasts about 100,000 years and interglacial periods, which typically last about 10-12,000 years.
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